Talks

coffee, tea, cookies at 16:15 in the main hall
Monday 16:30-17:30
Seminar room 1+2
- monthly seminars -
Seminar room 4
- weekly seminars -
Monday 11:00-12:00
Room 1D1
Wednesday 16:30 - 17:30
Seminar room 1D1
Thursday 14:00-15:00
Seminar room 4

 

 

 

Vorträge in chronologischer Reihenfolge

23 Jan 2019
09:30

ASG Workshop: Lagrangian Analysis of Ocean Surface Flows and a few Questions about Vortex Census

Imre Jánosi (Eötvös Loránd University, Hungary)

Room 1D1
23 Jan 2019
10:30

ASG Workshop: Death and Revival of Chaos

Tamás Tél (Institute for Theoretical Physics and von Kármán Laboratory of Environmental Flows, Institute of Physics, Loránd Eötvös University, Hungary)

Room 1D1
30 Jan 2019
16:30

Efficient generation and manipulation of photons with single molecules

Stephan Götzinger (MPI for the Science of Light, Erlangen)

Room 1D1 iCal Event
04 Feb 2019
16:30

Colloquium: Simulating Condensed matter physics with light

Prof. Jacqueline Bloch (Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies (C2N), Palaiseau, France)

When confining photons in semiconductor lattices, it is possible deeply modifying their physical properties. Photons can behave as finite or even infinite mass particles, photons inherit topological properties and propagate along edge states without back scattering, photons can become superfluid and behave as interacting particles. These are just a few examples of properties that can be imprinted into fluids of light in semiconductor lattices. Such manipulation of light present not only potential for applications in photonics, but great promise for fundamental studies. During the talk, I will illustrate the variety of physical systems we can emulate with fluids of light by presenting a few recent experiments: a photonic benzene molecule that emits helical photons, a photonic 1D lattice with topological edge states and photonic graphene with exotic Dirac cones. Perspectives in terms of quantum simulation will be discussed.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
25 Feb 2019
16:30

Colloquium: Fluctuations of Energy-Relaxation Times in Superconducting Qubits

Prof. John Martinis (Google and University of California, Santa Barbara)

Superconducting qubits are an attractive platform for quantum computing since they have demonstrated high-fidelity quantum gates and extensibility to modest system sizes. Nonetheless, an outstanding challenge is stabilizing their energy-relaxation times, which can fluctuate unpredictably in frequency and time. Here, we use qubits as spectral and temporal probes of individual two-level-system defects to provide direct evidence that they are responsible for the largest fluctuations. This research lays the foundation for stabilizing qubit performance through calibration, design, and fabrication.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
11 Mär 2019
16:30

Colloquium: tba

Prof. Dr. Alexander Szameit (Universität Rostock)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
08 Apr 2019
16:30

Colloquium: tba.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
15 Apr 2019
16:30

Colloquium: tba.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
25 Apr 2019
14:00

tba

Christof Weitenberg (Universität Hamburg))

Seminarroom 4 iCal Event
29 Apr 2019
16:30

Colloquium: tba.

Prof. Frederick C. MacKintosh (Rice University, USA)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event