Talks

coffee, tea, cookies at 16:00 in the main hall
Monday 16:30-17:30
Seminar room 1+2
- monthly seminars -
Seminar room 4
- weekly seminars -
Monday 11:00-12:00
Room 1D1
Wednesday 16:30 - 17:30
Seminar room 1D1
Thursday 14:00-15:00
Seminar room 4

 

 

 

Talks in chronological order

22 Aug 2019
02:00 PM

Entanglement Renormalization for Interacting Field Theories

Jose Fernández-Melgarejo (Universidad de Murcia)

We firstly introduce the Multiscale Entanglement Renormalization Ansatz (cMERA). Then, a general method for interacting QFTs is presented. We improve upon the well-known Gaussian formalism used in free theories through a class of variational non-Gaussian wavefunctionals for which expectation values of local operators can be efficiently calculated analytically and in a closed form. The method consists of a series of scale-dependent nonlinear canonical transformations on the fields of the theory under consideration. We will discuss the λϕ^4 and the sine-Gordon scalar theories to illustrate how non-perturbative effects far beyond the Gaussian approximation are obtained. [Based on: 1904.07241]

Seminarroom 4 iCal Event
26 Aug 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba.

Prof. David Quéré (ESPCI & Ecole polytechnique)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
11 Sep 2019
03:30 PM

IMPRS Seminar: Constructing a Single Molecule-Machinery?

Christian Joachim (CEMES - CNRS)

C. Joachim, Nanoscience Group Pico-Lab, CEMES-CNRS, Toulouse (France) WPI MANA-NIMS, Tsukuba (Japan) After the Blaise Pascal's calculating clock, the vacuum lamps calculators, the computers lithographed on the surface of a silicon crystal, what about embedding all or parts of an electronic calculator on a single molecule and more practically atom by atom at the surface of a large electronic gap semi-conductor? Even mechanical machinery like a train of gears, a motor or a car may be one day fully miniaturized down to the end of the material world on a single molecule? We will show how the idea of for example molecular electronics explored for over 30 years and boosted in 1987 by the 1981 invention of the scanning tunneling microscope had introduced a plethora of questions (The same a bit latter for single molecule mechanics starting in 1998): Are there enough quantum resources in a single molecule 1 nm in size to make a machine or the elementary parts of a nanoscale machine? Can quantum physics provides enough technological paths for exchanging energy and information with one and always the same molecule deposited on a surface? Does synthetic Chemistry allows for enlarging enough the molecule chemical structure so that it becomes a calculator or a motor by itself without reaching the size up of a protein by elementary function?

Seminarroom 4 iCal Event
11 Sep 2019
04:45 PM

IMPRS Seminar: Current-Induced Rotation and Modelling of Molecular-Scale Gears

Huang-Hsiang Lin (TU Dresden)

Current-Induced Rotation and Modelling of Molecular-Scale Gears The possibility of creating nanoscale molecular gears able to transfer motion has opened novel routes to implement true molecule-based mechanical analogs[1]. In the first part, we investigate, within model Hamiltonian approach, the rotational dynamics of a molecular gear. For this, we combine Langevin dynamics and non-equilibrium Green’s functions to computed a current-induced torque, which allows to study the influence of the electronic system on the rotational dynamics. Our model provides the rotational analog of the Anderson-Holstein Hamiltonian. In the second part, we focus on rotation transfer among many gears. In particular, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and also analytic approach to investigate the dynamics of coupled gears for two gears and many gears problem; Then we demonstrate the solution analytically and numerically. [1] Chao Li, Zhongping Wang, Yan Lu, Xiaoqing Liu & Li Wang, Nature Nanotechnology 12, 1071–1076 (2017)

Seminarroom 4 iCal Event
16 Sep 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: New Phases of Quantum Magnets in and out of Equilibrium

Prof. Dr. Christian Rüegg (Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Schweiz)

In quantum magnets spins form well-defined lattices and serve as model systems to study many-body quantum phases such as interacting quantum-dimer qubits, spin Luttinger-liquids, Bose glasses, or magnon Bose-Einstein condensates. Neutron, muon and photon sources are unique tools for high-precision studies of such phases, and of their correlations and excitations in as well as out of equilibrium. An overview of current frontiers in the field will be presented with special focus on recent developments in computational physics and exciting new opportunities that free electron lasers like SwissFEL and European XFEL will offer to study the time-dependence and out-of-equilibrium quantum mechanics of such systems.

Seminarroom 1+2+3 iCal Event
30 Sep 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba.

Prof. Jean Dalibard (College de France, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris, France)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
07 Oct 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
21 Oct 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
28 Oct 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba

Prof. Jonathan Simon (Chicago University, USA)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
30 Oct 2019
02:00 PM

Title t. b. a.

Raphaela Gessele (LMU Munich)

Room 1D1 iCal Event
18 Nov 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba.

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event
25 Nov 2019
04:30 PM

Colloquium: tba

Prof. Dr. Laurens W. Molenkamp (Universität Würzburg)

Seminarroom 1+2 iCal Event