Bust of Max Planck

Highlights

Awards and Honors

"Physik-Preis Dresden 2022" awarded to Professor Tomaž Prosen

On May 24, 2022, Prof. Tomaž Prosen from the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia received the "Physik-Preis Dresden" (Dresden Physics Prize), jointly awarded by the TU Dresden and the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems (MPI-PKS). The theoretical physicist receives the award for his outstanding work on quantum mechanical many-body systems, nonequilibrium statistical physics, quantum information, classical chaos and quantum chaos. Tomaž Prosen has authored over 200 publications on this broad range of topics, which have over 7000 citations and are recognized in expert circles worldwide. In 2016, he received a prestigious ERC Advanced Grant. The award ceremony took place at a festive colloquium in the Recknagel Building of the TU Dresden, preceded by a reception. Prof. Carsten Timm, Dean of the Faculty of Physics, gave the welcome address, and Prof. Roderich Moessner of MPI-PKS delivered the laudation. The Physik-Preis Dresden was endowed in 2015 by Dresden physicist Prof. Peter Fulde, the founding director of the MPI-PKS. The prize winners are determined by a joint commission of the TU Dresden and the MPI-PKS. In addition to the central criterion of scientific excellence, it is particularly important for the decision that the work of the award winners is of special significance for the cooperation between the two DRESDEN-concept partners MPI-PKS and TU Dresden and that their connection has been further strengthened in the long term. The 2022 awardee, Prof. Tomaž Prosen, has a wide range of connections to the professorships at the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Dresden and at MPI-PKS due to his broad scientific orientation.
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Awards and Honors

Funding to understand emergent physical properties of chromatin using synthetic nuclei

ERC Consolidator Grant for Jan Brugués

Today, the European Research Council (ERC) announced the winners of its latest  Consolidator Grant competition for ambitious mid-career researchers. Jan Brugués, research group leader both at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG) and the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems (MPI-PKS) is one of the 313 laureates who were awarded the 2022 ERC Consolidator Grants. The funding is part of the EU’s Horizon Europe programme, and the winners will receive in total 632 million Euros to tackle big scientific questions. In total, 2,652 applicants submitted proposals and 12% of them will receive the funding. Male and female applicants were equally successful in winning the grants. The future grantees will carry out their projects at universities and research centers across 24 EU Member States and associated countries. This new round of grants will create an estimated 1,900 jobs for postdoctoral fellows, PhD students and other staff at 189 host institutions.
Jan receives the grant for his project “Understanding emergent physical properties of chromatin using synthetic nuclei.” The main goal of this project is to resolve how the physics of molecular-scale activities result in the material properties of chromatin and how those contribute to chromatin organization and function. Jan Brugués explains: “With my project, I hope to provide a physical description of the material state of chromatin across different scales and contribute to reveal the basic physical principles that govern nuclear organization and function.”
Congratulations Jan!
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Awards and Honors

Artificial intelligence and stochastic models to guide personalized cancer therapy

Steffen Rulands receives funding within the REDESIGN consortium to bring personalized cancer therapy to patients using organoids and predictive models. The Saxon Ministry for Science, Arts and Tourism is funding four research projects for individualized cancer therapy with around 2.3 million euros. The projects will start this year and run for three years. One of the projects is the REDESIGN consortium with the goal to develope personalized medical therapy of Gastric Cancer. This type of cancer is difficult to treat once resistance to standard chemotherapy develops. Therefore, there is a need to tailor the therapy to each patient. The REDESIGN consortium is led by Daniel E. Stange (University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus Dresden), in collaboration with Steffen Rulands, Bon-Kyoung Koo (Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences), and Mette N. Svendsen (University of Copenhagen). Steffen Rulands will use functional drug response data generated from patient-derived organoids to predict the efficacy of different regimines of chemotherapy. These organoids are initially grown by clinical research labs from patient tumor tissue samples’and then exposed to varying cocktails of chemotherapy. Organoids are sequenced before and after treatment to detect mutations that may affect the outcome of therapy. Moreover, organoid growth speed, among other parameters, are measured during the treatment. These datasets will be used by Steffen's group to develop quantitative predictions of treatment efficiency using two complementary approaches, stochastic models and deep neural networks. The combination of the two methods will allow for high predictive and explanatory power while tackling the complexity of the data. This complexity arises from the presence of mixed populations of cells in the tumor and different constellations of mutations between tumors from different patients. Eventually, the developed model will help understand how resistance to therapy develops. More importantly, it will predict how any given patient would respond to chemotherapy based on the constellation of mutations found in the tumor. It will also assess the likelihood of tumor relapse in patients for each possible therapeutic approach and recommend the therapy that targets the tumor cells carrying mutations that make the tumor more aggressive and relapsing.
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Awards and Honors

Physik-Preis Dresden zum fünften Mal verliehen

Am 6. Juli 2021 wurde der „Physik-Preis Dresden“ der TU Dresden und des Max-Planck-Instituts für Physik komplexer Systeme (MPI-PKS) zum fünften Mal verliehen. Der Physik-Preis Dresden 2021 geht an Professor Gijsje Koenderink von der Technischen Universität Delft. Gijsje Koenderink ist eine herausragende experimentelle Biophysikerin mit einer Reihe von bahnbrechenden Arbeiten zur Zellmechanik und zellulären Krafterzeugung. In Anerkennung ihrer hervorragenden Beiträge zur Physik der Zellen erhält Gijsje Koenderink den Dresdner Physikpreis 2021, der gemeinsam vom Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme und der TU Dresden verliehen wird. Die Forschung von Gijsje Koenderink ist von großem Interesse für eine Reihe von Forschungsgruppen in Dresden, insbesondere im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters "Physik des Lebens". Die Verleihung des Physik-Preis Dresden 2021 an Professor Koenderink schafft eine wertvolle Verbindung zwischen ihrer Forschungsgruppe und der Forschung auf den Gebieten Polymerphysik, weicher kondensierter Materie, Biophysik und Zellbiologie in Dresden. Gastgeber des Abends, Prof. Dr. Frank Jülicher, Direktor am Max-Planck-Institut für Physik komplexer Systeme, war überaus erfreut, dass mit Gijsje Koenderink eine so bedeutende internationale Forscherpersönlichkeit geehrt wurde. Der Physik-Preis Dresden wurde 2015 von dem Dresdner Physiker Prof. Peter Fulde, dem Gründungsdirektor des MPI-PKS gestiftet. Die Preisträger werden von einer gemeinsamen Kommission der TU Dresden und des MPI-PKS bestimmt. Neben dem zentralen Kriterium der wissenschaftlichen Exzellenz ist für die Entscheidung vor allem wichtig, dass die Arbeiten der Preisträger für die Zusammenarbeit zwischen beiden Dresden-concept Partnern MPI-PKS und TU Dresden von besonderer Bedeutung sind und deren Verbindung langfristig weiter gestärkt wurde.
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Awards and Honors

Carlsberg Foundation Young Researcher Fellowship for Anne E. B. Nielsen

Anne E. B. Nielsen receives 670 thousand euro from the Carlsberg Foundation to search for and investigate new types of non-thermal behaviors in strongly correlated quantum many-body systems. The Carlsberg Foundation Young Researcher Fellowships are three-year grants that allow the grantee to establish an independent research group working on a research topic within natural science, social science, or the humanities.
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Awards and Honors

ERC Starting grant for Christoph Weber

The European Research Council (ERC) has selected 436 early-career top researchers from 40 nationalities across Europe in the 2020 'Starting Grant' competition. The prestigious grants enable the best young researchers in Europe to build their own teams and to conduct pioneering research across all disciplines. Among the awardees is Christoph Weber, research group leader at the MPI-PKS and the Center for Systems Biology Dresden. With his project „FuelledLife”, Christoph and his group want to understand how living cells regulate phase separation and to unveil the role of phase separation for the emergence of life. "Living cells rely on the compartmentalisation of thousands of different molecules and their chemical reactions,” Christoph explains. “Remarkably, many of such compartments form by phase separation of polymers and are controlled by sequence-specific interactions but also cellular fuel driving the system away from thermodynamic equilibrium. If we knew how such polymers evolve in time and compartmentalise in multi-component mixtures, we would better understand the role of phase separation in living cells and how prebiotic cells could have emerged at the origin of life. My team and I will develop a theory for phase separation and chemical reactions in multi-component mixtures that are driven by irreversible, fuel-driven reactions. Our theoretical studies will let us understand how living cells regulate phase separation at the origin of life and determine the prerequisites of a protocell to divide, replicate and undergo selection." Christoph will receive 1.5 million Euros over a period of five years. Congratulations to the Weber group!
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Awards and Honors

European funding to unravel scientific mysteries

Steffen Rulands receives ERC Starting Grant The prestigious ERC starting grants allow the best young researchers in Europe to build their own teams and to conduct pioneering research across all disciplines. Among this year’s awardees is Steffen Rulands, research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, and the Center for Systems Biology Dresden! With the interdisciplinary project “AHH-OMICS” Steffen and his group aim to apply theoretical methods originally developed in the physics of solids to understand the mechanisms underlying the behaviour of cells during development, regeneration and ageing. Steffen explains, “The recent breakthroughs of single-cell sequencing technologies for the first time give us the opportunity to probe the inner life of cells with unprecedented molecular detail. Biological function, however, relies on how many molecules work together in space and time, which up to now cannot be inferred from these experiments.” The theoretical physicist continues, “It’s like a car, where from detailed knowledge of all car parts we still cannot understand how an engine works. We need methods from statistical physics to do that! The same holds true for the cell – from detailed measurements of molecules we don’t learn about biological function. The theoretical tools that will be developed in my project will bridge this gap.” The ERC project will combine the novel single-cell technologies with methods from statistical and solid-state physics to understand collective processes regulating cellular behaviour. With this conceptually new approach the Rulands group will overcome existing limitations in an emerging technology and pioneer the application of methods from statistical physics to single-cell genomics. Steffen Rulands will receive 1.5 million Euros from the ERC over a period of five years. The European Research Council (ERC) has selected 436 early-career top researchers from 40 nationalities across Europe in their 2020 'Starting Grant' competition. The funding, worth in total €677 million, is part of the EU’s Research and Innovation programme, Horizon 2020. Congratulations to the Rulands group!
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Awards and Honors

Anne E. B. Nielsen receives the H.C. Ørsted Research Talent Prize 2020

The H.C. Ørsted Prize and the two H.C. Ørsted Research Talent Prizes are awarded annually to celebrate the Danish physicist and chemist Hans Christian Ørsted's influence on culture, art, thinkers, and scientists all over the world. The prizes are awarded by the H.C. Ørsted Association and Langeland municipality with support from the energy company Ørsted. H.C. Ørsted discovered in 1820 that an electric current produces a magnetic field, and to celebrate the 200 years anniversary of this influential discovery, the prizes are this year awarded to scientists, whose research is related to electromagnetism and its applications in a broad sense. Anne E. B. Nielsen receives the H.C. Ørsted Research Talent Prize, which is donated with a diploma and 10,000 Danish kroner, for her many innovative contributions to the fields of anyon research and quantum light, where she investigates possibilities that arise by combining quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. The prize ceremony took place on H.C. Ørsted's birthday on August 14 in Rudkøbing on the Danish island Langeland, where H.C. Ørsted grew up.
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Awards and Honors

Dresden Excellence Award 2019

Stadt Dresden zeichnet zum dritten Mal herausragende Abschlussarbeiten mit dem Wissenschaftspreis aus.

Am Sonnabend, 29. Februar 2020, vergibt die Landeshauptstadt Dresden gemeinsam mit dem Netzwerk „Dresden – Stadt der Wissenschaften“ den mit 30 000 Euro dotierten DRESDEN EXCELLENCE AWARD. „Mit dem Wissenschaftspreis der Stadt Dresden zeichnen wir als Stadtverwaltung zum dritten Mal in Folge vier Absolventinnen und Absolventen Dresdner Hochschulen für ihre hervorragenden wissenschaftlichen Abschlussarbeiten aus. Diese Würdigung stärkt die Wahrnehmung Dresdens als exzellenten Wissenschaftsstandort“, sagt Oberbürgermeister Dirk Hilbert, der zugleich als Vorsitzender der Jury wirkte.
Ausgezeichnet werden in jedem Jahr vier eingereichte Arbeiten, die besondere Relevanz und Zukunftsorientierung für die Dresdner Stadtentwicklung und Stadtgesellschaft vorweisen.
Die mit 12 000 Euro dotierte Auszeichnung in der Kategorie Habilitation geht an Dr. habil. Sebastian Wüster für seine Habilitationsschrift „Quantentransport in ultrakalten Rydberg Aggregaten“. Die Forschung in der theoretischen Physik untersucht die Anwendung von kalten Rydberg Aggregaten auf in der Quantensimulation relevante Transportprozesse. Dr. Wüster publizierte im Rahmen seiner Habilitation 15 wissenschaftliche Arbeiten, darunter einen Review Artikel und sechs Physical Review Letters. Mit dieser Leistung wird Dr. Wüster als internationaler Experte ultrakalter Rydbergphysik wahrgenommen und ist zunächst auf eine Assistenzprofessur in Ankara/Türkei und schließlich als Assoziierter Professor an das Indian Institute for Science, Education and Research Bhopal/Indien berufen worden. Damit setzt Dr. Wüster nun mit seiner eigenen Forschungsgruppe international die Dresdner Forschung in der theoretischen Physik auf höchstem wissenschaftlichen Niveau fort.
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Awards and Honors

Physik-Preis Dresden

Am 14. Januar 2020 wird der Physik-Preis Dresden des Max-Planck-Instituts für Physik komplexer Systeme (MPI-PKS) und der TU Dresden an Dr. Adam Nahum von der Oxford University vergeben. Die Preisverleihung findet ab 16 Uhr im Rahmen eines Festkolloquiums im Recknagel-Bau der TU Dresden statt. Adam Nahum hat in seiner noch jungen wissenschaftlichen Laufbahn bereits eine Reihe exzellenter und vielbeachteter Beiträge geleistet. Besonders kennzeichnend für ihn ist seine herausragende Fähigkeit, Konzepte aus verschiedenen Bereichen der theoretischen Physik zu einem universellen Verständnis des Verhaltens komplexer Systeme zu verbinden und so tiefe Einsichten zu erhalten. „Die Originalität seiner Ansätze und die außergewöhnliche Vielfalt seiner Forschungsthemen, verkörpern in idealer Weise den Grundgedanken des Physik-Preises Dresden,“ begründet Prof. Walter Strunz, Vorsitzender des Preiskomitees, die Entscheidung für Adam Nahum. Verankert in dem Grundgedanken „Die Zukunft gehört denjenigen, die zusammen arbeiten“ ist es das Ziel des Preises, gerade solche herausragenden Forscherinnen und Forscher auszuzeichnen, an deren Arbeiten beide DRESDEN-concept-Partner MPI-PKS und TU Dresden besonders interessiert sind. An Nahums Forschungsgebieten, darunter Quantenvielteilchenphysik, Nichtgleichgewicht oder Quantenchaos arbeiten verschiedene Gruppen der TU Dresden und des MPI-PKS. Viele der Dresdner Physiker freuen sich daher auf den einwöchigen Aufenthalt des Preisträgers, der weitere Fachvorträge und vor allem viel Raum für Diskussionen mit sich bringt. Der Preisträger Adam Nahum Adam Nahum hat in Oxford und Chicago Physik und Philosophie studiert und 2013 an der Universität Oxford über kritische Phänomene in Schleifen-Modellen promoviert. Nach einer Postdoc-Phase am Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) ist er seit 2017 wieder an der Oxford University.
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